Differences in the English Language

By Jack McDermott – Top Admit Consulting

When writing your admissions essay, you need to be concerned with a multitude of issues. You need to be dynamic, persuasive, and tell a story that makes you special. From the grammar standpoint, you need to use the English language accurately, correctly, and have transitions that make your writing fluid to show that you can succeed in a collegiate English-speaking academic environment. However, one of the few things that you really should not worry about, are minor differences in the use of the English language by people from different countries.

While the majority of students from Southeast Asia tend to apply to American colleges (partially because they are so numerous), an increasing number are applying to colleges in Britain, Ireland, Canada, and Australia. While these countries all speak “English,” there are some minor differences in word usage and spellings. Some students have written to Top Admit Consulting, worried about having their essays match “British English” or “Canadian English.”  This really is not worth the effort, and may in fact, work against you.  

A foreign student who focuses on trying to add “Canadian” words into their essay simply to apply to a Canadian school may make the essay seem inauthentic and contrived. Remember your uniqueness is partially due to the fact you come from a different part of the world and are familiar with different cultures and religions – not that you have mastered Canadian “slang and common phrases” used by native English-speaking people. 

topadmit 發表在 痞客邦 PIXNET 留言(0) 人氣()

How Your Grades Affect Your Graduate School Application

Jack McDermott – Top Admit Consulting

Your undergraduate cumulative grade point average is one of the most common measurement tools admissions committees use to evaluate your academic performance and potential. American, British and Canadian universities typically standardize the grading system into a 4.0 system.  It is true that some colleges evaluate a B+ as a 3.3 or 3.33 or 3.4. The admission committee generally uses the values assigned by your college -- provided the top grade is a 4.0.  However, the evaluation of your “grades” is multi-dimensional.

Class Rank.  University professors, admissions committee members and deans have consistently complained about the issue of “grade inflation.” Over time, high schools, colleges and graduate schools have issued more “A” grades, and less “C” grades. To account for this problem, admission committees have placed increasing reliance on class rank – basically a percentile ranking of the applicant versus their classmates. For example, a 3.8 GPA sounds impressive, but if this ranks you 79 out of 100 (only 21st percentile), it is much less impressive. In addition, being in the top 10 percentile of an elite international university like National Taiwan University is more impressive than being in the top 10 percentile of a less competitive school. 

topadmit 發表在 痞客邦 PIXNET 留言(0) 人氣()

The Graduate School Admissions for Foreign Students

By Jack McDermott – Top Admit Consulting

It is important to understand that the United States, Canada and Britain welcome foreign students.  It adds diversity to their campuses, adds new language skills and global perspectives, increases the international reputation of the college, and allows the college to expand its alumni network to other countries and continents.  In addition, several college professors have mentioned that foreign students are more dedicated to their studies, and less likely to be overwhelmed by the college “party scene.”

In an increasingly global economy, it is becoming even more essential that students develop an international perspective, and even, and international education.  In 2009, the number of foreign students studying in the United States reached an all-time high despite an economic downturn.  In 2008, there were 671,616 foreign students registered in United States universities. Now the Council of Graduate Schools estimates that 16% of all graduate students in the United States are foreign students. 

Following the terrorism attacks on U.S. soil in September 2001, the increase temporarily stalled due to new American regulations regarding foreign visas. However, beginning in the 2003-2004 timeframe, the number of foreign students has increased steadily until the economic crisis that began in 2008. Although three countries (India, China and South Korea) continue to dominate the nationalities of foreign students in the United States, the recent uptick in students has been primarily driven by China. The most recent 2008 data by the Institute of International Education:

topadmit 發表在 痞客邦 PIXNET 留言(0) 人氣()

Writing the Personal Statement – Start by Brainstorming

By Jack McDermott – Top Admit Consulting

One of the most difficult elements of a graduate school application to the United States, Canada or Britain is the personal statement.  Although  some specialized graduate programs have specific questions (to ensure you do not send your generic personal statement) the personal statement is generally very similar: it asks you to tell something about yourself.

In some ways, it may be the most important element.  Generally your GPA, Undergraduate College, Extracurricular Activities, Awards, Work Experience and Graduate School Admissions Tests have already been decided (or soon will be).  Your personal statement is the one thing that you can still perfect that will make a difference in the admissions process. 

topadmit 發表在 痞客邦 PIXNET 留言(0) 人氣()